Thursday, March 2, 2017

Enthralling description of the Epsom Derby 1934 in The New York Times. Excerpt from Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’




Ferdinand Kuhn jr. wrote in The New York Times:

“Windsor Lad, the superb 3-year-old owned by the Maharajah of Rajpipla, won the English Derby by a length today after one of the most thrilling last-minute struggles in all the 151 years of racing on Epsom Downs. Lord Woolavington’s Easton finished second. He was ridden by Gordon Richards, England’s champion jockey, who narrowly missed gaining the first Derby triumph of his career. A neck behind Easton came Lord Glanely’s Colombo, the overwhelming favourite, who had failed only after an effort which left most hardened racegoers spellbound.

From a good start Medieval Knight was the first to show in front. At the mile post he was still in front but yielded the pace setting to Tiberius as the field sped downhill on the back stretch. At Tattenham Corner Tiberius was still in the van but jockey Smirke had moved Windsor Lad fast into second place.

Down the broad straightaway under the eyes of King George and perhaps half a million of his subjects these three had shot ahead out of a field of nineteen and until the last three had thundered along almost neck and neck. Close to the rails was Windsor Lad, his jockey crouching low and cracking the whip to urge the horse on. In the middle was Easton, with Richards straining every nerve to win. On the outside, nearest the packed grandstand, Colombo was making the fight of his life as if conscious of all the hundreds of thousands of pounds that had been staked on him. His jockey had lost his position against the rails rounding Tattenham Corner, but Colombo soon forged ahead from behind. To the astonished crowd it looked as if the favourite might snatch the victory away from Windsor Lad after all.

But fifty yards from home the strain was too much. Once they headed for the judges, the Maharajah’s colt quickly bounded for the front while Colombo swung wide. That move may have cost the race as Smirke took Windsor Lad the shortest way home. Colombo, who had never been beaten before, dropped behind while the purple and cream colours of the Maharajah flashed past in front.

Windsor Lad finished in 2 minutes 34 seconds, thus equalling the all-time record established by Hyperion last year. Sir Abe Bailey’s Tiberius finished fourth. All the rest were hopelessly beaten, including the only American-owned entry Bondsman, who struggled home in eleventh place.”

(Author Indra Vikram Singh, grandson of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com. Follow Indra Vikram Singh on Twitter @IVRajpipla).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995

Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7

Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Glasgow Bulletin on the exciting moments after Maharaja Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla’s Windsor Lad won the Epsom Derby 1934. Excerpt from Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’

Windsor Lad’s £1,000,000 bill for bookies

250,000 Crowd See Hot Derby Favourite Well Beaten


As soon as Windsor Lad had flashed past the winning post, his owner, the Maharajah of Rajpipla, went forward to greet him. The Maharajah is a regular visitor to English racecourses, and when the crowd recognised him they set up an ear-splitting cheer. He was obviously thrilled at this typical British greeting, and he beamed with pleasure as he doffed his grey top hat. The Aga Khan sprinted forward to congratulate him, and he was soon surrounded by a host of friends and acquaintances.

“Give me five minutes,” pleaded the Maharaja when interviewed by a reporter. “I can’t collect my thoughts.” And his actions were true to his words. His slightly grey hair was ruffled with excitement. He waved his hands as he expostulated, his features twitching in a nervous smile.

A polite message was then whispered in the ear of the joyful owner. “The King has sent for you,” he was told. The Maharaja turned in a daze, still carrying his hat in his hand, and walked away up the stairs. 

The Maharaja of Rajpipla rules a State of 1600 square miles in the Bombay Presidency. He spends a great deal of his time in this country, and resides at The Manor, Old Windsor in Berkshire, hence the name, Windsor Lad, for the best horse he has ever owned. His chief recreations are polo and racing.

(Author Indra Vikram Singh, grandson of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com. Follow Indra Vikram Singh on Twitter @IVRajpipla).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995



Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7
Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Celebrities in Cameo. Feature on Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla in The Bystander. Excerpt from Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’

The Bystander, June 5, 1934


CELEBRITIES in CAMEO

The Maharaja of Rajpipla

THE MAHARAJA OF RAJPIPLA is the Peter Pan of the Ruling Princes of India. Aged forty, he is really ageless, though his youngest son (Indrajeet Singhji, father of author Indra Vikram Singh) is eight and his eldest (Rajendra Singhji, who later succeeded to the title of Maharaja) is about to get married. Known as “Pip”, he accentuates the nickname by having one of his racehorses known as “Mr. Pip”. “Pip’s” greatest ambition is to win the Derby, and to-morrow, if all goes well, this will be realised by Windsor Lad, which, as I write, is third favourite.

“Pip” has two selves - the one on the surface when in England, and the other when he is in his native State - an hour-and-a-half by air from Bombay. In England he is Bohemian, lighthearted, shy, merry, diffident. In his home he is responsible, extremely grand, very much a king, and tremendously respected. Indeed, he is a very good ruler, and his millions of subjects are prosperous, and proud of him.

He has an enormous palace, a mole on his cheek, a fleet of motor-cars, a lasting devotion to cameras, a vast guest-house, a passion for cigars, and a mansion on the river. When he arrives at the first or last named, an electric light shines on the roof. He personally supports his own State army. Polo matches take place every day from October to April when he is there. Guests are invited to take part in all kinds of big-game hunting, and the latest copy of the New Yorker is always on tap.

Yet it is England, where he is entitled to a salute of thirteen guns, which is his spiritual home. He goes to all the race meetings. He has the Manor House at Old Windsor. And at his Sunday-afternoon parties you never know whom you are going to meet - Maharajas, film magnates or Mollisons - they come and go incessantly, under the courteous eye of “Pinky”, his charming little A.D.C.

“Pip” is really a delightful person. He is an admirable host, thoughtful, kindly, and permanently youthful. In India he has one elephant - Raj Mangal. In England he has one object - hospitality. I hope very much that he leads in the winner to-morrow.

For two years he has headed the list of winning owners in India, and he has already won the Irish Derby and the Irish 2000 Guineas with Embargo.

England has known him annually for thirteen years from April to October, as a result of which he has become the most un-Oriental potentate of my acquaintance.

(Author Indra Vikram Singh, grandson of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com. Follow Indra Vikram Singh on Twitter @IVRajpipla).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995



Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7
Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

The Daily Telegraph on Epsom Derby 1934 win of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla’s horse Windsor Lad. Excerpt from Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’



The Daily Telegraph wrote on the Epsom Derby 1934 win of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla’s horse Windsor Lad:                                                                            

Windsor Lad equals Hyperion’s record in the Derby

The Maharaja of Rajpipla was naturally immensely elated. He is greatly liked by all his English friends, and this magnificent victory has come to him after about a dozen years of ownership on our Turf. I recall a victory on Epsom’s racecourse some years ago when Embargo won for him the City and Suburban. He was no more than a handicapper. Windsor Lad was bought by him as a yearling because he was a son of Blandford, whose stock were winning the big races. Blandford, indeed, has now sired three Derby winners – Trigo, Blenheim and Windsor Lad. It is a great performance for that sire, now, by the way, at the Whatcombe stud in England. 

Royal Congratulations

The Maharaja was speedily on the course, waiting to lead in his horse. One of the first to congratulate him was the Aga Khan. Many others cordially extended their felicitations. Very soon after the jockey had weighed in, the Maharaja was invited to proceed to the Royal box and there receive the congratulations of the King and Queen. He was truly delighted with the warmth of the reception on every hand, and will certainly never forget this wonderful day in his life.

The Maharaja of Rajpipla is entitled to be satisfied on the result that he has the best colt in the country. There is less conviction that Colombo was beaten on his merits. Meanwhile the owner of the winner can look forward to receiving some important cheques from bookmakers on Monday which splendidly garnish the stake and the honours of the race itself. A long time ago, the Maharaja made a bet, before he left India, of £4,000 to £400 and £1,000 to £100 a place. There were other wagers since at shorter prices. The total amount has doubtlessly been well liquidated by what a generous and delighted owner has already disbursed in presents, especially, of course, to those who were chiefly instrumental in bringing about the victory.

(Author Indra Vikram Singh, grandson of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com. Follow Indra Vikram Singh on Twitter @IVRajpipla).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995


Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7
Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Quiet confidence of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla in an interview a day before the Epsom Derby 1934. Excerpt from Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’


Thus spoke Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla in an interview on 5th June 1934, a day before his horse Windsor Lad won the blue riband of the turf, the Epsom Derby of England:

“Every few years a Derby comes along which is dominated by one horse. Two years ago it was Orwell, six years ago it was Fairway, fifteen years ago it was The Panther. Now we have Colombo. The fate which has befallen post-war Derby “hot-pots” is causing many people now to look for something better than Colombo, although Lord Glanely’s grand colt has never been beaten.

Let us think for a moment what is needed to win the Derby. The exact distance of the race is a mile and a half and about 39 yards. The winner covers the distance in anything from 2 min. 34 sec., as did Hyperion when record-breaking last year, to 2 min. 47 sec., as did that grand colt Coronach when winning in heavy mud eight years ago.

In other words, a horse must travel at a rate of 34 miles an hour, or rather more, up hill, down dale, turning once sharp right after the start, and then sharp left at Tattenham Corner, and generally proving himself a versatile creature of high speed.

THE STAYER WINS

There is no stretch of race track in the world which demands so much of a horse as this switch-back and tortuous mile and a half over some of the best downland in Great Britain.

A horse must be a true stayer to win the Derby. The race is won too fast from the start to permit any dawdling from a horse whose rider seeks to conserve his strength for a late spurt.

It is therefore desirable, if possible, to find a colt which has won over the Derby distance, or has otherwise proved in public, his ability to stay. Colombo does not come within this category, and the mile of the Two Thousand Guineas and the Craven Stakes is the farthest he has ever travelled in a public race, though I believe he has galloped over a mile and a half on the trial ground.

Horses which come within the category I have mentioned include my own colt, Windsor Lad, who won the Chester Vase and the Newmarket Stakes; Tiberius, undoubtedly a good stayer;  Medieval Knight, who just beat Tiberius at Lingfield; and Alishah, who won over the mile and a half at Chester.

I don’t say these are the only mile-and-a-half horses in the Derby, but they are the only ones which have proved in public that they can stay well enough to win a Derby.

Naturally, I have considerable faith in my own colt, Windsor Lad. At any rate, he has won over the distance, an attribute which cannot yet be paid even to Colombo. Windsor Lad is a much improved colt, and whatever his fate at Epsom those who back him can be assured of a great run for their money.

It must not be thought that I am minimising the chances of other horses, and in this connection I well recall the year when Manna, Colombo’s sire, won both the Guineas and Derby. In doing so he confounded many critics who regarded him as a non-stayer.

Despite their forebodings, he won the Guineas easily, and in the Derby, in heavy rain and deep mud, he won many lengths from Zionist and The Sirdar, with that brilliant colt Solario beaten out of a place.

Rarely has an Epsom crowd seen such a long trailing procession in the Derby as they did behind Colombo’s sire, that supposed non-stayer, Manna. And, remembering Manna, I am not going to join in the chorus of critics who fear for Colombo’s staying power. Let the race itself decide that point. As usual, the Derby sets a difficult puzzle, especially if you adopt the age-old pastime of trying to beat the favourite.

I think Windsor Lad will not be out of the first three.”

(Author Indra Vikram Singh, grandson of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com. Follow Indra Vikram Singh on Twitter @IVRajpipla).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995



Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7
Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

The Gohil Rajput Clan - Chapter 21 of Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’

Coat of arms of Rajpipla State, ruled by Gohil Rajput dynasty for over 600 years until merger with Union of India in 1948.

Bardic tales and genealogical records suggest that in the ancient times the Gohil Rajput clan ruled over Saurashtra, Kathiawar, in present-day Gujarat. Alexander Kinloch Forbes observed in his Ras-Mala, “The Gohil Rajputs of the solar race to which belonged Ramchandra and the Vallabhi dynasty, migrated to Mewar after the destruction of Vallabhi (in Saurashtra).” The story goes that in the year 542 A.D. Vallabhi was raided and a massacre took place in which King Shiladitya was killed along with rest of the clan. The pregnant queen Pushpavati escaped because she was away on a pilgrimage. She gave birth to a boy in a cave in the mountains of Mallia, handed the baby to Kamlavati, a Brahmin lady from Birnagar, and went away to commit sati.

This orphan prince was named Muhideosur Gohadit or Guhil, derived from ‘guhu’ which means cave. His clan came to be known as Guhilputra or Guhilot, and thus a new line of Suryavanshi Rajputs came into being, which was eventually named Gohil. Young Guhil grew up among the tribal Bhils in Anandpur and when he was 11 years old became their chieftain, holding sway over a hilly forested tract near modern Idar in north Gujarat.

The dynasty flourished and Kalbhoj, who came to be known as Bappa Rawal, eighth in descent to Guhil, seized Chittor and became ruler of Mewar in 734 A.D. The Guhilots consolidated their hold over Mewar, and in 977 A.D. their chief Salivahan migrated with part of the clan to Marwar, leaving behind his eldest son Shakti Kumar in Mewar with the rest of the kinsmen. The Guhilots under Salivahan settled down at Juna Khergarh on the Luni River (present-day Bhalotra, south-west of Jodhpur). There is still a village called ‘Gohilon ki Dhaani’ that perpetuates the memory of this valiant clan in Marwar.

The Guhilots had a chequered existence in Mewar until the seige by Alauddin Khilji’s army in 1303. The subsequent massacre of the menfolk and jauhar by the women forced the Guhilots to appoint Hamir Singh, removed by 13 generations, as chief. Hamir Singh, hailed from Mount Sisoda, and so the Mewar clan was named Sisodia. Hamir Singh seized Chittor in 1326 and assumed the title of Rana. From the Sisodias of Mewar emanated other princely states like Dungarpur, Banswara, Pratabgarh and Shahpura in present-day Rajasthan, Dharampur in Gujarat and Barwani in Madhya Pradesh. The Bhonsle rulers of Kolhapur, Satara, Sawantwadi and Nagpur trace their lineage to Mewar as also the royal family of Tanjore and the Ranas of Nepal.  
 
The Gohils continued to rule Marwar until the early years of the 13th century when they were displaced by the Rathores who had been expelled from Kannauj following the invasions of Muhammad Ghori and the establishing of the Sultanate by the Slave Dynasty in Delhi. The Gohils marched back to Saurashtra after a lapse of five centuries, where they became governors of the Chalukyas, and then carved out their own principalities. The most famous of their chiefs during this period were Sejakji, Ranoji and Mokhdaji, and their descendants founded the princely states of Bhavnagar, Rajpipla, Palitana, Lathi and Vallabhipur.

Mokhdaji Gohil, Chief of Ghoga, with capital at Perimbet in the Gulf of Cambay.
The Ruling Princes and Chiefs of India published by The Times of India in 1930 stated, “No single portion of the vast and vulnerable land of Ind is wrapt deeper in the fascinating glory of immemorial legend, tradition and romance than is Kathiawar, the ancient territory of the Vallabhi kings. To Kathiawar journeyed the mighty Gohils, that historic Rajput tribe whose very name signifies ‘the strength of the earth’, centuries before Norman William fought Harold Saxon at Senlac. Originally, as it would seem, vassals of the Vallabhi kings, the Gohils, by degrees conquered the greater portion of Kathiawar, until they permanently rooted themselves in the soil of Saurashtra. They were fighters ever, these men - warriors to the bone and marrow. Sejakji - Ranoji - Mokhdaji - what memories of raid and foray, of pitched battle, of fierce siege do these names not recall! It was Mokhdaji, it may be remembered, who took Gogha from its Mohamedan defenders and made of Perim a royal capital. Mighty in physical stature as he was in deeds of derring do, he died fighting against Muhammad Tughlaq on Gogha soil, leaving behind him a name never to be forgotten in the annals of Saurashtra.”  

Maharana Gambhirsinhji of Rajpipla (seated second from left), with his eldest son Yuvraj Chhatrasinhji to his right, two younger sons to his left, and courtiers, in 1875.
The Gohils ruled Rajpipla until exactly 601 years after Mokhdaji’s death. It was a throne that his younger son Samarsinhji had succeeded to, assuming the name Arjunsinhji. The clan held on to the principality in the face of fierce onslaughts by the Sultans of Ahmedabad, the Mughals and the Gaekwars of Baroda. The British intervention provided welcome respite, even though it was not an easy relationship until Maharana Chhatrasinhji acceded to the gadi in 1897. And who would have thought that his son Maharana Vijaysinhji would go to Britain and win their most coveted race, thereby earning the felicitations of the King and commoners alike, and being lauded the world over as few Indian princes have ever been.

Maharaja Vijaysinhji, the last ruler of Rajpipla.
(Author Indra Vikram Singh, grandson of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com. Follow Indra Vikram Singh on Twitter @IVRajpipla).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995



Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7
Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.

Friday, October 28, 2016

Manchester Dispatch report on the Epsom Derby 1934 triumph of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla



The following is an excerpt from the Manchester Dispatch report of 7th June 1934 on the triumph of Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla in the Epsom Derby as his horse Windsor Lad finished first in this blue riband of the turf.

The Derby wheel of fortune. Windsor Lad’s Victory
by Sir John Foster Fraser

Yet, after Smirke, the jockey in purple and cream sash, pressed Windsor Lad past the post, there rose a cheer as though the favourite had really won. Into the course - the long broad ribbon of green between the excited multitude - stepped the slim figure of the Maharaja, dark of feature, carrying his white topper in his hand with a red rose in his coat, bowing and smiling as he went to meet his horse. When he came into the enclosure he was mobbed by a hundred white-toppered friends. The Aga Khan, who had three losing horses in the race, patted him on the shoulder.

THE KING

Then the Earl of Harewood came and got the Maharaja out of the clutch of a crowd of interviewing journalists and took him to the King to be congratulated. For everybody was there, the King and Queen, and most of the Royal family, down to little boys from Epsom Town, who were allowed to crouch at the feet of policemen on promising to be good. The Derby is an institution as well as a race.

(This has been reproduced from Indra Vikram Singh’s book ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’. Author Indra Vikram Singh can be contacted on email singh_iv@hotmail.com).

A Maharaja’s Turf
ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
Published in India by Sporting Links
Fully Illustrated
Hardcover 8.75 x 11.5 x 0.6 inches (landscape)
140 Pages
MRP Rupees 1995



Indra Vikram Singh’s latest books published by Sporting Links:
A Maharaja’s Turf  ISBN 978-81-901668-3-6
The Big Book of World Cup Cricket  ISBN 978-81-901668-4-3
Don’s Century  ISBN 978-81-901668-5-0
Crowning Glory  ISBN 978-81-901668-6-7
Distributed in India by:  Variety Book Depot, AVG Bhawan, M-3, Middle Circle, Connaught Circus, New Delhi-110 001, India. Tel. + 91 11 23417175, 23412567, Email varietybookdepot@gmail.com.